Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 34 of 34

Thread: Rant: tired of the ignorance

  1. #26
    House Lannister
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,282
    Quote Originally Posted by RvNijnatten View Post
    Two great posts, which only for the content in them, deserve to be read multiple times. I agree and feel that most of us, could make better gains, if we wouldnt obsess that much. It is however, hard to not obsess about something you love.
    RvN, what makes you believe that most of us could make better gains if we didn't obsess over bb/weightlifting as much? It just always seems to me that when I'm really focused and driven to hit a goal and think about it all the time I'm more likely to achieve it. Maybe that's just me. I'll admit I have OCD tendencies.

  2. #27
    House Lannister
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Belial View Post
    Couldn't tell you, mate. I got a meal framework that includes a cup of oats and yogurt for breakfast, and my dinners I shoot for about a cup of brown rice or third of a box of pasta and pound of some sort of meat... and try to get between 3000 and 3600 calories a day. More if running.

    That's about it. Training is four days a week, loose westside framework, marathon training on weekends these days.



    Codeguru- You're welcome to listen to whomever you want. As you said, you can't argue with physical results. Back when I started and weighed my food, ate 6 meals a day, and breathed bodybuilding, I'd never believe it could be any other way.

    ...My best gains came long after that.
    Hmm. Interesting. When you say that your best gains came long after that, were you still getting in plenty of food and rest and still training regularly during that period?

    Also Belial, what somatotype which you consider yourself to be? Meso?

  3. #28
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,884
    I think the point is that if you are obsessing over the little things, you are going to drive yourself crazy because the process is a long one. If you are driving yourself crazy, you are more likely to make dumb changes to your routine. It helps to just settle in and get the work done day-after-day and year-after-year. Stick to a proven routine, add weight to the bar every chance you get, eat when you are hungry, and stop doing all the little things that don't have a big impact on your goals and save that energy for recovery.
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  4. #29
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,644
    This should be a sticky...
    Quote Originally Posted by Belial View Post
    Just as a parting thought...

    Not to be discouraging here, but I've noticed those that get criticized the most tend to be those who wear their lifestyle on their sleeve but don't necessarily have the appearance to match. Frankly, I don't think any of the big guys around here, or elite athletes of the world, spend their time talking about cycles and protein intake with non-enthusiasts.

    However, if they DID, I doubt they'd get much criticism. What people don't understand are those who are NOT elite athletes who are on the fixed 6 meal a day schedule with exact macro and micronutrients measured out... but really would benefit the most just from eating whatever they can get and training hard for a few more years.

    Talk about it a little less and let the results speak for themselves. Champions never bore their friends with details on their training. They simply keep their mouths shut and do it. Once the results come, people will ask questions, but they'll be taking notes.

    The other thing is... is weighing your food and chugging milk really necessary? It IS borderline obsession. Hard training and a solid diet will get you 98% of the way there. Weighing your food is on that list of things that makes up the other 2%. The other 2% that most people don't need. Hell, even elite athletes don't weigh their food; they have a ballpark idea of their caloric intake, but certainly not to the gram. I'd look at you funny too.

    If you're getting negative feedback from people on these things...ignorance aside, chances are it's not healthy eating and lifting that they don't understand, it's the obsession.

    And they may just have a point.
    To the OP,
    Stop worrying about what other people think. Stop worrying about "somatypes"! Eat more, train hard, be consistent - continue to make steady progress, keep it up for five years and NO ONE is going to be giving you crap about your protein intake, and even if they do, you'll just smile and nod and it won't bother you at all because you will confident in your chosen path.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #30
    House Lannister
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    To the OP,
    Stop worrying about what other people think. Stop worrying about "somatypes"! Eat more, train hard, be consistent - continue to make steady progress, keep it up for five years and NO ONE is going to be giving you crap about your protein intake, and even if they do, you'll just smile and nod and it won't bother you at all because you will confident in your chosen path.
    I'm really not worried about what other people think. Honest. I'm also not worried about what Belial's somatotype really is. I was merely curious. It's interesting to learn more about fellow members than just some stats and a username.

    I really just started this thread to keep this section of the forum alive. Lately, It's been pretty dead in here. I found something mildly irritating that I was certain some other WBB members had experienced, and I thought we could all discuss our experiences with it here. I certainly wasn't attempting to annoy anyone with my post.

  6. #31
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,884
    You definitely got the discussion going with your last few threads. It's great because it gives people a chance to re-learn the basics.
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  7. #32
    House Lannister
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road View Post
    You definitely got the discussion going with your last few threads. It's great because it gives people a chance to re-learn the basics.
    Haha thanks for the pat on the back.

    And I did learn a lot from both yours and Belial's post. Maybe make them both a sticky titled "Finding Balance" or something similar?

  8. #33
    LuNa
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tilburg, The Netherlands
    Posts
    3,716
    Quote Originally Posted by chevelle2291 View Post
    RvN, what makes you believe that most of us could make better gains if we didn't obsess over bb/weightlifting as much? It just always seems to me that when I'm really focused and driven to hit a goal and think about it all the time I'm more likely to achieve it. Maybe that's just me. I'll admit I have OCD tendencies.
    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road View Post
    I think the point is that if you are obsessing over the little things, you are going to drive yourself crazy because the process is a long one. If you are driving yourself crazy, you are more likely to make dumb changes to your routine. It helps to just settle in and get the work done day-after-day and year-after-year. Stick to a proven routine, add weight to the bar every chance you get, eat when you are hungry, and stop doing all the little things that don't have a big impact on your goals and save that energy for recovery.
    Exactly the answer i was going to post. As it is such a lengthy process, i think just getting work done and not obsessing will give you much better consistency and results in the long run.

  9. #34
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,644
    Quote Originally Posted by RvNijnatten View Post
    Exactly the answer i was going to post. As it is such a lengthy process, i think just getting work done and not obsessing will give you much better consistency and results in the long run.
    Yes. IMO, many of the people who are overly obsessive about goal-setting/attainment early in the game, don't make it to later in the game... That's not to say you should not have goals, just that heightened expectations about where you should be and when can be pretty dissappointing if and when they are not met. Goals and expectations are not the same thing, but most people can't or won't unravel them.
    Last edited by Sensei; 09-23-2010 at 02:33 PM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

Similar Threads

  1. The Ignorance of People
    By WORLD in forum General Chat
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 02-02-2007, 11:50 AM
  2. Please excuse my ignorance...
    By struggler in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-20-2006, 08:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •